Most Likely to Design the Next Generation

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Most Likely to Design the Next Generation

Gabriella Stover, Opinion Writer

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He wears a Vlone black jacket with the purple signature V on the back. His trousers match with purple circles of the brand name scripted in bold letters. Finally, a studded black belt ties the outfit together. It is a bold outfit, with more meaning behind it than you think.

Gabe Ventura is a senior at Kings High School with a passion for the fashion industry. Through designer clothes, and name brand shoes, he finds his self expression. Growing up in the 2000s has exposed Ventura to many trends, and even a common rebirth of trends from the 80s and 90s. Through countless forms of social media, and big news about celebrity fashion, the desire for the latest trend has inspired the modern youth to invest in what they wear. This is what inspired Ventura’s love for fashion and the fashion business.

“I really don’t have just one person I can get inspiration from. I mainly get my fashion inspiration from people with similar styles. People on the streets and from people on Instagram. Sometimes though, I get inspired from what people wore in the 80s and early 2000s. I watch a lot of movies and music videos from those eras.” says Ventura.

Ventura is very close to a senior Danny Orenday, who is also very interested in the fashion industry and finds himself wearing extravagant brands alongside Ventura.

“Gabe has been influenced by clothes for a long time. Fashion isn’t like a statement we really follow. Mainly [influenced] through Instagram and movies honestly, I basically just wear whatever I think is cool. We just come up with stuff and find influence through street styles, even as simple as a dude wearing a cool outfit, and you just have a vision for it,” says Orenday.

What started as an interest soon became a hobby of buying and reselling name brand clothing and accessories to eventually a career in the retail business. Ventura buys name brand and trendy clothes to sell and make profit from Grailed. He mainly sells off of his Instagram page and gets customers around the local Ohio area.

“I’ve been in the resale business for 2 years now. I really started selling more product last year though. I’ve made a lot more last year than I did the year I first started. I would love a career in fashion but I don’t feel the need to go to school for fashion, I just see it as a waste of time and money,” says Ventura.

Ventura works at Plato’s Closet and has been getting more exposure in the business aspect of the fashion industry which has been helping with his own fashion business.

“I get a decent amount of business. If I compared the amount I make in a year compared to the amount other people make who live in different cities, my total profit would be a fraction of their total profit. I think it’s because I have to find product on my own. I don’t know anyone that can get my product for nearly as cheap as what others are getting it for,” says Ventura.

Although Ventura makes a good profit recently, it is difficult for him to depend on consumers.

“Prices are almost as high as they would be at a discount store. So with these higher prices means there’s bigger risk of them not selling as well because I have to raise the price higher than I’d like to,” says Ventura.

Starting as a small student made business and being able to obtain everything it takes to run a whole business is very difficult to manage alone.

“Without me being able to network and considering the fact that I have little to no connections it’s definitely a lot easier to lose money than it is to gain I must say. I just get lucky finding product and I’m a great salesman so that’s just how I make more than I lose in this business,” says Ventura.

Even with difficulties in the business, Ventura pushes through it with his overwhelming passion.

“I like looking at older styles and bringing them back and putting my own twist on them.” says Ventura.